Data for dissertations November 6, 2017

36615 Los Angeles Metropolitan Area Surveys [LAMAS] 6, 1973
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36615.v1

36644 Afrobarometer Round 6: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in
Algeria, 2015
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36644.v1

36721 Afrobarometer Round 6: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in
Nigeria, 2014-2015
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36721.v1

36763 Afrobarometer Round 6: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in
Liberia, 2015
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36763.v1

36814 Newly Licensed Registered Nurse Survey, 2011
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36814.v1

36838 Afrobarometer Round 6: The Quality of Democracy and Governance in
Sudan, 2015
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36838.v1

36902 The National Survey of Fertility Barriers, 2010 [United States]
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36902.v1

36950 Chicago Health Aging and Social Relations Study: Attrition
http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36950.v1

Incentives aren’t always clear

For seven months, just over a thousand Washington, D.C., police officers were randomly assigned cameras — and another thousand were not. Researchers tracked use-of-force incidents, civilian complaints, charging decisions and other outcomes to see if the cameras changed behavior. But on every metric, the effects were too small to be statistically significant. Officers with cameras used force and faced civilian complaints at about the same rates as officers without cameras.

From the NYT.

Books worth citing

I’m starting a new series of posts here at Public Management Research for promoting books that I think are under-cited. Some are in public administration; some are from outside the discipline. Maybe it’s just a way for me to remember books that have had outsized impact on my career. 

Data for dissertations November 2, 2017

36673 Eurobarometer 85.1 OVR: European Youth, April 2016 http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36673.v1

36798 Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (12th-Grade Survey), 2016 http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36798.v1

36799 Monitoring the Future: A Continuing Study of American Youth (8th-and 10th-Grade Surveys), 2016 http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36799.v1

36813 Newly Licensed Registered Nurse Survey, 2009 http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36813.v1

36873 National Social Life, Health and Aging Project (NSHAP): Wave 3 http://doi.org/10.3886/ICPSR36873.v1

A useful tool for project management

It’s hard to manage complex research projects – especially if those involving multiple collaborators. It’s even hard managing solo projects if only because most of us have multiple ongoing obligations. 

I’ve used Slack for a while now for managing my projects. It’s mostly known in the coding world for those running Agile design and production strategies but it can be useful for any sort of project, including keeping track of ideas for classes.

I use the channels feature to create a private channel for each project. Some are for me alone; others are shared with collaborators. It’s like a stream of ideas, links, duties, and other ephemera that persists – unlike the stuff that goes to die in my email. 

I also use Hangouts or Evernote when they’re useful. But Hangouts is really one channel per collaborator so projects are mixed. And Evernote seems more useful as a notebook or wiki. Both have purposes but neither duplicates Slack. 

Comments are closed but feel free to send your suggestions about tools like Slack via Twitter at @abwhitford.